Are You Ready to “Fall Back”?

Yep, it’s just about that time. The fall Daylight Saving Time adjustment is almost upon us.

DST Change Instructions Available Online

On the first Sunday in November, at 2:00am, most of us here in the U.S. are supposed to turn our clocks back by one hour. While resetting all our clocks is generally simply an inconvenience at home, it can cause real problems at work.

For instance, what about people who work a shift that spans the time change?

Overnight Shifts

The law requires us to pay employees for the number of hours they actually work. This can raise some interesting issues when the clocks change in the spring and fall.

An couple of examples might help:

Spring

The employee arrives for work at midnight and clocks in. At 2:00am, the clocks instantly jump forward to 3:00am. While it appears an hour has passed, no time has actually elapsed. The employee’s shift ends at 8:00am. While a comparison of start and end times would make it appear they’d worked eight hours, in fact, one hour was lost when the clocks were set forward, so the employee really only worked seven hours. You are only obligated to pay them for the seven hours they actually worked.

Fall

The employee arrives for work at midnight and clocks in. At 2:00am, the clocks are set back to show 1:00am. In other words, the clocks count off the hour between 1:00am and 2:00am twice. The employee’s shift ends at 8:00am. While a comparison of start and end times would make it appear they’d worked eight hours, in fact, the clocks undercounted their time by one hour because of being set back. The employee is entitled to pay for nine hours.

Note that if that extra hour puts them over 40 hours in that work week, they’re due overtime at time-and-a-half. (And in some states, they’re due overtime for working over eight hours in one day, regardless of how many hours they worked in the week.)

No Time-Shifting

Note that you can’t “average” the time and pay eight hours in both spring and fall. The law says you have to pay hourly employees for the actual hours they work. If you want to be generous, you can pay them for eight hours in the spring, but you’ll still be on the hook for nine hours (and possible overtime) in the fall.

Just a little something to keep in mind.

DST Instructions Available

If you need help resetting your Acroprint time clock for Daylight Saving Time, we have print-friendly instructions available free on our website. Click here to find the DST instructions for your clock.

Tired of making Daylight Saving Time adjustments? Take a look at our AcroTime online time clock. Since it’s all online, it automatically adjusts for the spring and fall DST changes without any intervention on your part. Sweet!

2 Comments

  1. Marlon says:

    Great post..

    We really get confused with Daylight Savings

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